Standing Strong For Employee Rights

Do you know what reasonable accommodations your employer must make for you?

| Feb 10, 2021 | Americans With Disabilities Act |

Employers must know about various employment laws and abide by them in many areas of their operation, including reasonably accommodating their employees with disabilities. 

Whether you have a lifelong disability or you develop a condition later in life, the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) guarantees most employees the right to ask for any reasonable accommodations you need to keep working without fear of reprisal.

What are reasonable accommodations?

If an employer were to make certain adjustments, it would equal the playing field between disabled and non-disabled workers when securing or performing jobs. The ADA refers to these workplace modifications as reasonable accommodations

When must employers provide reasonable accommodations?

There are several instances in which the ADA requires employers to provide applicants or employees with reasonable accommodations. Employers must ensure that all prospective applicants receive a fair chance of applying for and securing the job. They must also work alongside their disabled employees to identify ways to perform their job-related tasks adequately. 

What are some examples of reasonable accommodations?

Offering modified or part-time work schedules can benefit more than just disabled employees. Updating restrooms to make them accessible or workstations to make them ergonomic or installing ramps are all examples of productivity enhancers that aren’t only beneficial for disabled workers, but visitors and non-disabled employees as well.

What can you do if your employer failed to provide reasonable accommodations?

It’s a violation of federal law for your San Fernando Valley employer to deny you reasonable accommodations. Their denial may also violate California employment laws. Don’t let your employer deny your rights. An attorney can advise you what steps you should take next to assert your rights under the ADA.